Gezerite

Gezerite refers to both the people of Gezer and the ethnic group to which they belong. Little is known about their origins except that Gezerites are obviously not Mulan, Nar, Raumvira, Imaskari, Tuigan or Shou. Physically, they are black-skinned like some Shaaran tribes, but unlike them they are also tall and fine-featured. Mulan people in particular, but also many others in Faerun, find Gezerites almost irresistibly handsome. Men are often very well conditioned, especially if they are wealthy. Gezerites have thick, woolly hair which is usually worn in rows or dreadlocks for people of ordinary status, but nobles often prefer a large, bushy halo. For women, any style can be found, including shaven. Clothing is usually pure white when relaxing at home, but brightly colored when out on the street. Gezerites prefer the colors red, green, black and yellow. When jewelry is worn, men prefer gold while women wear silver.

The language of these people, which uses the Thorass alphabet, is also called Gezerite, and bears a resemblance to Turmic, spoken by the modern-day Turami people. The Turami were formerly found throughout Mulhorand, Unther and Chessenta prior to the fall of Imaskar, when the Mulan seized much of this territory and drove them in the direction of modern-day Turmish. This and other historical clues suggest that the Gezerites may be descendants of an ancient group of Turami that moved east against the Mulan tide and became stranded in their present location.

Gezerites are deeply religious, being devout followers of Dedeism. Most are farmers, producing staples such as grain and vegetables, but also honey wine and coffee, a valuable caravan commodity. In the cities such as Gondar, the capital, craftsmen and merchants are found, producing and trading a wide variety of religious and secular goods. A great many Gezerites are officials of the church, called the Ge’ez. Gezerites share a few recognizable customs with their distant cousins the Turami. Gezerite men are fond of beards and often trim them perfectly square in the style that, in The Western Realms, is seen as distinctive to Turmish. When visiting a Gezerite home, one is expected to bring a small dish of sweets or nuts, another Turmic custom. As in Turmish, the dish itself is usually a human skull, often an ancestor, which is sometimes draped in silk or inlaid with gems, precious metals, or copper (if the family is not wealthy). In Gezer, the skull dish is seen as one more reminder of the way in which Dede has defeated death for his believers.

Gezerite

The Widow Harun KevinHenehan KevinHenehan